Monday, April 30, 2012

State of the Stack (April 30, 2012)

This is my fifth State of the Stack post. It is my way to keep track of my review books and to hopefully reduce the stack that I have waiting for me. I take a look at my review commitments on the last Monday of each month. Please feel free to join in and let me know the state of your stack.


Here is my Review Books Spreadsheet. Yellow highlighted books are ones past their publication date that I still haven't read and reviewed. I use pink highlights for reviews due in even numbered months so that I can see at a glance how many I have for each month. Ideally, this keeps me from over-committing to review books. 


Here is the physical review stack in order of publication date:
The stack has been reduced to only 12 books stretching out until an October 11 publication date. I am, however, waiting for three books with May publication books to arrive.

Here are the Kindle review copies I have in the order that they were added to my LibraryThing account. Three of them have May publication dates.



I read sixteen books from my review stack this month. Links go to my review if the review has already been posted. Otherwise the link goes to Amazon.


Of course, I couldn't have a month when I didn't add to the stack. I got 8 more books for review (links go to Amazon).

Somehow May really got away from me. So far I have accepted 13 books for review that have May publication dates and May hasn't even begun. Luckily, I was able to get a head start on them and have already read four. I have also read one of the books that I thought I would be reading in June because I had a gap while waiting for one of the May books to arrive from Amazon Vine. All but one of my May review books are young adult. 
I am currently reading A Confusion of Princes by Garth Nix which will be released on May 15 and which was the Amazon Vine book I was waiting for.  


How are you doing with your review stack?


Sunday, April 29, 2012

Stacking the Shelves (April 30, 2012)



Tynga of Tynga's Reviews is starting a new meme to spotlight the books we receive each week. She explains at her site. She also does a very nice vlog each week showing her books (and hopefully her new baby).

Another option is Mailbox Monday which was originally started by Marcia at A Girl and Her Books. She hosted it for a long time but in April 2010 she decided to make it a traveling meme. You can see all the details here. You will also find a list of the 2012 hosts. 

Cindy from Cindy's Love of Books is hosting in April and Martha from Reviews by Martha's Bookshelf will be hosting in May.
I guarantee that your TBR pile will grow when you see all the wonderful books everyone gets. You will also discover lots of great blogs and lots of books that you won't be able to live without.

This is the first time that I have participated in these memes. I look forward to connecting with some blogs that are new to me and to meeting some old blogging friends again. 


This week I added seven books to my TBR mountain. All links go to Amazon if you want to know more about each book.
I received A Confusion of Princes by Garth Nix and Spark: A Sky Chasers Novel by Amy Kathleen Ryan through the Amazon Vine program. Both are science fiction/fantasy books which is one of my preferred genres. I have read and enjoyed other books by Garth Nix and thought I would try this new one. Spark is the sequel to Glow which I read, listened to and reviewed earlier.
Storm by Brigid Kemmerer is a paranormal romance.

The False Prince by Jennifer A. Nielsen is a fantasy that is filled with "danger, deceit, and hidden identities."
Shades of Milk and Honey by Mary Robinette Kowal is a historical fantasy. Amazon says it "is exactly what we could expect from Jane Austen if she had been a fantasy writer."

The Immortal Rules by Julie Kagawa arrived and was promptly donated to my high school media center for my students to enjoy. I read the eARC recently and loved the interesting new take on vampires and Kagawa's very cinematic writing. 

Unfortunately most of these books will just have to sit on the stack and wait for my summer vacation. I have 12 young adult books to read for review during May which doesn't leave much (if any) time to read books I buy.


What did you get this week?

Saturday, April 28, 2012

ARC Review: The Hero's Guide to Saving Your Kingdom by Christopher Healy

The Hero's Guide to Saving Your Kingdom
Author: Christopher Healy
Publication: Walden Pond Press (May 1, 2012)


Description: Prince Liam. Prince Frederic. Prince Duncan. Prince Gustav. You've never heard of them, have you? These are the princes who saved Sleeping Beauty, Cinderella, Snow White, and Rapunzel, respectively, and yet, thanks to those lousy bards who wrote the tales, you likely know them only as Prince Charming. But all of this is about to change. Rejected by their princesses and cast out of their castles, Liam, Frederic, Duncan, and Gustav stumble upon an evil plot that could endanger each of their kingdoms. Now it's up to them to triumph over their various shortcomings, take on trolls, bandits, dragons, witches, and other assorted terrors, and become the heroes no one ever thought they could be.


Debut author Christopher Healy takes us on a journey with four imperfect princes and their four improbable princesses, all of whom are trying to become perfect heroes—a fast-paced, funny, and fresh introduction to a world where everything, even our classic fairy tales, is not at all what it seems.


My Thoughts: This story was an interesting example of one writer's imaginative version of what comes next after the fairy tales ends with "and they lived happily ever after." The one problem with fairy tale romances is that the hero and heroine don't really get to know each other. For example, Cinderella didn't know that her fairy tale Prince Charming (who is actually Prince Frederic) led a very boring life and, as she told another character, was afraid of dust bunnies. And Briar Rose, when kissed by her prince, turned into a major spoiled brat. Snow White marries her prince who is really an odd and annoying fellow. And Rapunzel's prince didn't really rescue her. The wicked witch let her go in the hopes of getting some positive publicity for herself.


This is the story of four very different princes - Frederic, Gustav, Duncan, and Liam - as they wander around and stumble into a plot to bring down their various kingdoms. Along the way they have some dangerous adventures and learn to depend on each other and learn what their strengths are. I began the story by finding the princes all sort of annoying. Let me quote: "All the princes had their issues -- Frederic was easily intimidated, Liam's ego could stand to be reined in a bit, and Gustav could use some impulse control -- but Duncan was flat out strange. I gradually grew to like them. Their hearts were in the right place as they set off to rescue Ella from the evil witch and free their kingdom's bards from captivity. Along the way they battle a very polite giant, a fire breathing dragon, and a Robber King who happens to be 10-years-old.


But even beyond the princes, I liked Ella who wasn't going to sit around and wait to be rescued and who had a number of adventures of her own. I also liked Liam's little sister Lila who also set off to help her older brother and who was more effective than most of the princes.

I think middle grade fantasy lovers will enjoy this story. It has lots of adventure and lots of middle grade humor.

Favorite Quote:
"Get him how?" Duncan asked. He looked at the sword in his hand. Unsure of what he should do, he tossed the sword at the giant. The sword flipped through the air a couple of times and landed softly on the grass only a few feet away.

"That was the most pathetic thing I've ever seen," said Gustav.

Duncan stepped forward to retrieve his sword, tripped over his belt, hit his head on a rock, and knocked himself out cold.

"I spoke too soon," said Gustav. "That was the most pathetic thing I've ever seen."
I chose this one as part of the Amazon Vine program. You can buy your copy here.

Friday, April 27, 2012

Book Beginning & Friday 56: A Hero's Guide to Saving Your Kingdom by Christopher Healy



Happy Friday everybody!!




Book Beginnings

Book Beginnings on Friday is now hosted by Rose City Reader. 
Anyone can participate; just share the opening sentence of your current read, making sure that you include the title and author so others know what you're reading. 
If you like, share with everyone why you do, or do not, like the sentence.

The Friday 56
Rules:
  • Grab the book nearest you. Right now.
  • Turn to page 56.
  • Find the fifth sentence.
  • Post that sentence (plus one or two others if you like) along with these instructions on your blog or (if you do not have your own blog) in the comments section of Freda's Voice
  • Post a link along with your post back to Freda's Voice
Don’t dig for your favorite book, the coolest, the most intellectual. Use the CLOSEST.

I chose The Hero's Guide to Saving Your Kingdom by Christopher Healey from Amazon Vine for review because I like fairy tale retelling and twisted fairy tales. This is the part of the description that convinced me to read this book:
Debut author Christopher Healy takes us on a journey with four imperfect princes and their four improbable princesses, all of whom are trying to become perfect heroes—a fast-paced, funny, and fresh introduction to a world where everything, even our classic fairy tales, is not at all what it seems.

Beginning:
Prince Charming is afraid of little old ladies. Didn't know that, did you?
Friday 56:
"Wait," Frederic said. "This witch - Zaubera -she's pretty powerful, right?"

"She's an old lady," Gustav tossed off. "I'm not afraid of old ladies. Are you?"

"Ones who can pick me up and throw me, yes."

Thursday, April 26, 2012

ARC Review: Breaking Beautiful by Jennifer Shaw Wolf

Breaking Beautiful
Author: Jennifer Shaw Wolf
Publication: Walker Childrens; 1 edition (April 24, 2012)


Description: Allie lost everything the night her boyfriend, Trip, died in a horrible car accident—including her memory of the event. As their small town mourns his death, Allie is afraid to remember because doing so means delving into what she’s kept hidden for so long: the horrible reality of their abusive relationship.

When the police reopen the investigation, it casts suspicion on Allie and her best friend, Blake, especially as their budding romance raises eyebrows around town. Allie knows she must tell the truth. Can she reach deep enough to remember that night so she can finally break free? Debut writer Jennifer Shaw Wolf takes readers on an emotional ride through the murky waters of love, shame, and, ultimately, forgiveness.

My Thoughts: I wasn't sure what to expect when I began this story but what I found was a compelling contemporary story about abuse from the victim's point of view. It was also a story about rebuilding a life after tragedy.



Allie is trying to get over the death of her boyfriend and get over the injuries she suffered. She has large gaps in her memory about the night she was hurt and Trip died. But what the rest of the world doesn't know is that, along with the grief Allie is feeling, she is also feeling relief that Trip is no longer around to abuse her. Trip was the handsome, rich, athletic golden boy of his high school. Allie was the newcomer to town who had already been in seven schools because her father was career military. When she saw him, she was dazzled that someone so wonderful would be interested in her. Of course, Hannah George, Trip's former girlfriend, cheerleader, and the most influential girl in school, is jealous and makes things hard for Allie at school. 

Gradually things start to go wrong and the cycle of abuse, apology, and presents begins. Allie doesn't tell because she doesn't think anyone would believe her and, besides, she is convinced it is her fault. If she were less clumsy or more able to be what Trip needs, he wouldn't hit her. She can't tell her twin brother Andrew about it. He has problems of his own with his cerebral palsy. She can't tell her mother because her mother is encouraging her to go out with Trip and she works for Trip's father. She can't tell her father because he hasn't been around much because of his military career. 



Then there is Blake Evans. Blake, Andrew and Allie have known each other since they were kids. Andrew and Allie used to spend time each summer in the town visiting their grandmother. But Blake has problems of his own. He is the son of a girl who ran away with a school teacher and returned a couple of years later with a drug problem and with him. She dumped him on his grandmother and disappeared only to reappear every few years just in time to mess up his life again. Most recently, his mom took Blake to Reno to live with her and a new husband but, after the marriage fell apart, Blake got into trouble and spend some time in juvenile detention for breaking and entering. That means that he has the reputation in town as a juvie and is an outcast in school himself. 


This was a very engaging story. It is filled with tension. When an investigator hired by Trip's father comes to town, a lot of pressure is put an Allie to try to reconstruct those last hours with Trip while still maintaining her secrets about how he treated her. It is also the story of moving on after a tragedy and finding out who really cares for her. I liked how the relationship between Blake and Allie plays out. 

I recommend this one to readers of contemporary fiction. I enjoyed it very much.

Favorite Quote:
I can't have anyone prying into my head, pulling out the secrets I don't want to share. Things I can't remember. Things I have to keep hidden. Since the accident my mind is so full of fuzz that I can't trust the lock on my brain.
I got this eARC from Walker Children's Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. You can buy your copy here.

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Should I Read?: Scott Westerfeld


Waiting on Wednesday is a great meme by Jill at Breaking the Spine. I usually participate in the meme each week but I have a problem. I already have tons of books waiting for me on my TBR mountain and I really don't need to add any new ones to the stack. What I thought that I would start to do on Wednesdays is spotlight something on my stack and look for encouragement that I should actually move it to my currently reading list. 
Today I would like your opinion about a series. I have an autographed set of Leviathan, Behemoth, and Goliath by Scott Westerfeld on my stack.

I had a chance to meet Mr. Westerfeld and hear him speak about this series when Goliath was published last Fall. I saw lots of fans dressing in costumes and was intrigued by the steampunk nature of these books. I liked his Uglies series and I liked Peeps but I didn't really like his Midnighter's series.

What do you think? Do I move these up to the top of the TBR pile?


Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Teaser Tuesday: Breaking Beautiful by Jennifer Shaw Wolf



Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
Share the title and author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Breaking Beautiful by Jennifer Shaw Wolf has made it to the way of my review stack - the virtual one. I got this eARC from Walker Children's Books via NetGalley. This book will be out on April 24.


I don't read very many young adult contemporaries but this description drew me in:
Allie lost everything the night her boyfriend, Trip, died in a horrible car accident—including her memory of the event. As their small town mourns his death, Allie is afraid to remember because doing so means delving into what she’s kept hidden for so long: the horrible reality of their abusive relationship.

When the police reopen the investigation, it casts suspicion on Allie and her best friend, Blake, especially as their budding romance raises eyebrows around town. Allie knows she must tell the truth. Can she reach deep enough to remember that night so she can finally break free? Debut writer Jennifer Shaw Wolf takes readers on an emotional ride through the murky waters of love, shame, and, ultimately, forgiveness.
Teaser:
The truth is, I'd be happy to never leave this room. No, happy isn't the right word, maybe comfortable. Except comfortable doesn't fit my self-imposed prison wither. The only word that fits is terrified. Terrified to leave this room and face...

Monday, April 23, 2012

The Immortal Rules Trailer

I recently read and loved The Immortal Rules by Julie Kagawa. I also expect my pre-ordered copy to arrive this week. I am eager to share it with my students!

I was even more pleased to find this trailer when I was looking at my Google Reader today:

And, have you had a chance to check out the new website for the Blood of Eden series? I have to admit that I had to watch the trailer multiple times before I figured out the password to get in to see the exclusive items which was not a hardship. In fact, I had a few people watching it with me and trying to count the Blood of Eden symbols.

I know the series has been optioned for the screen. I hope everything goes well and that it will eventually make it to movie theaters. I might be tempted to get in line for the midnight showing if that happens.

What do you think? Have you read The Immortal Rules yet?

Sunday, April 22, 2012

In My YA Mailbox (April 22, 2012)






The weekly In My Mailbox post is hosted by Kristi at The Story Siren. It is fun to see what everyone else gets in their mailboxes, shopping bags, and library visits. Click on the link to The Story Siren's site to see the rules and join in the fun.
 
I guarantee that your TBR pile will grow when you see all the wonderful books everyone gets. You will discover lots of great blogs and lots of books that you won't be able to live without.


I took advantage of a promotion on April 19 by a group of authors to add some new YA books to my Kindle for free. I also received one print book this week.
Ashlyn's Radio by Wilson Doherty was one of the free Kindle books. This one sounds like a spooky mystery.

Charlie Woodchuck is a Minor Niner by Dalya Moon is a middle grade mystery.
Face-Off by Stacy Juba is a hockey story about rival brothers.

Dark Before Dawn by Stacy Juba is a paranormal thriller.
Practice Cake by Dalya Moon is a contemporary romantic comedy. 

Away from Whipplethorn by A. W. Hartoin is a middle grade fairy story. 
Savage Cinderella by PJ Sharon is the last free book I got. Here is part of the description:
Eighteen year-old Brinn Hathaway has survived alone in an abandoned cabin in the High Country of North Georgia since she was a child. If her life is lonely and less than complete, at least she is safe from the man who kidnapped her, held her captive, and left her for dead in a shallow grave in the mountains. She believes that her parents are dead, the police are her enemy, and that if she returns to the world, her tormentor will find her. With the help of some unlikely friends, she has what she needs to survive, but is surviving enough?
All of the above books are self-published titles that I had added to my "maybe I'll get a chance to read these someday" list.

The last book I got was The Last Princess by Galaxy Craze. This one is a dystopia that takes place in England and is centered around a young princess who is the only survivor after a revolutionary who makes the royal family his first target.

That is what I added to my TBR stack. What did you get this week?

Saturday, April 21, 2012

ARC Review: The Immortal Rules by Julie Kagawa

The Immortal Rules
Author: Julie Kagawa
Publication: Harlequin Teen (April 24, 2012)


Description: In a future world, vampires reign. Humans are blood cattle. And one girl will search for the key to save humanity.


Allison Sekemoto survives in the Fringe, the outermost circle of a vampire city. By day, she and her crew scavenge for food. By night, any one of them could be eaten.

Some days, all that drives Allie is her hatred of them. The vampires who keep humans as blood cattle. Until the night Allie herself is attacked—and given the ultimate choice. Die…or become one of the monsters.

Faced with her own mortality, Allie becomes what she despises most. To survive, she must learn the rules of being immortal, including the most important: go long enough without human blood, and you will go mad.

Then Allie is forced to flee into the unknown, outside her city walls. There she joins a ragged band of humans who are seeking a legend—a possible cure to the disease that killed off most of humankind and created the rabids, the mindless creatures who threaten humans and vampires alike.

But it isn't easy to pass for human. Especially not around Zeke, who might see past the monster inside her. And Allie soon must decide what—and who—is worth dying for.


My Thoughts: This isn't going to be my usual kind of review. If you follow blogs at all, you have seen many thoughtful and glowing reviews. I don't have much to add to that conversation. I certainly thought that the book was remarkable. It was well-written, had an exceptionally sympathetic main character, and had excellent world building. What I want to tell you is the kind of reader that I am going to be recommending this book too.


If the reader loved The Hunger Games, they will also love the post-apocalyptic setting for this story.  You see, there was a plague that wiped out most of the human population, turned many of the humans and animals into Rabids (mindless, killing machines) and caused the vampires to comes out of hiding and take over. The humans that survived are living marginal lives and are constantly struggling to survive.

If the reader loves vampires or even thinks they are a little tired of them, this book introduces vampires in a new light and features very villainous vampires and very heroic ones. Faced with the choice of dying or becoming something she hates, Allie chooses to become what she hates but then decides not to be a monster. Her mentor Kanin is one of the heroic vampires or, at least, not a villainous one. He teaches her what she needs to know to survive her new life.

If the reader loves adventure, they will love Allie's journey as she looks for a place she belongs and travels through the wilderness outside the city where she was born.

If the reader loves star-crossed romance, they will love the relationship between Zeke and Allie. There doesn't seem to be a happy ending for a girl who is a monster and a boy who was taught to hate and destroy them.

If a reader likes to ponder the big questions, this is the book for them. Allie struggles with what it means to be a human in her world. She sees examples of extreme cruelty and extreme kindness and has to forge her own set of values.

I know that I will be recommending this story to anyone who will listen to my pitch about it. I think that any sort of reader will find something to love and something to think about within these pages.

Favorite Quote:
Die as a human, or become a bloodsucker. Either way, the choice was death, because the vampires were dead, they just had the audacity to keep living--walking corpses that preyed on humans to survive. I hated the vampires; everything about them--their city, their pets, their domination of the human race--I despised with my entire being. They had taken everything from me, everything that was important. I would never forgive them for what I had lost.
I got this eARC from Harlequin TEEN via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. You can buy your copy here. I have already pre-ordered mine!

Friday, April 20, 2012

Book Beginning & Friday 56: The Immortal Rules by Julie Kagawa



Happy Friday everybody!!


Book Beginnings

Book Beginnings on Friday is now hosted by Rose City Reader. 
Anyone can participate; just share the opening sentence of your current read, making sure that you include the title and author so others know what you're reading. 
If you like, share with everyone why you do, or do not, like the sentence.

The Friday 56
Rules:
  • Grab the book nearest you. Right now.
  • Turn to page 56.
  • Find the fifth sentence.
  • Post that sentence (plus one or two others if you like) along with these instructions on your blog or (if you do not have your own blog) in the comments section of Freda's Voice
  • Post a link along with your post back to Freda's Voice
Don’t dig for your favorite book, the coolest, the most intellectual. Use the CLOSEST.

The Immortal Rules by Julie Kagawa has worked itself to the top of my review stack. I have been hearing so many good things about this book around the blogs I follow and I am a huge fan of her Iron King series. I am excited to begin this one. Here is the description:
In a future world, vampires reign. Humans are blood cattle. And one girl will search for the key to save humanity.

Allison Sekemoto survives in the Fringe, the outermost circle of a vampire city. By day, she and her crew scavenge for food. By night, any one of them could be eaten.

Some days, all that drives Allie is her hatred of them. The vampires who keep humans as blood cattle. Until the night Allie herself is attacked—and given the ultimate choice. Die…or become one of the monsters.

Faced with her own mortality, Allie becomes what she despises most. To survive, she must learn the rules of being immortal, including the most important: go long enough without human blood, and you will go mad.

Then Allie is forced to flee into the unknown, outside her city walls. There she joins a ragged band of humans who are seeking a legend—a possible cure to the disease that killed off most of humankind and created the rabids, the mindless creatures who threaten humans and vampires alike.

But it isn't easy to pass for human. Especially not around Zeke, who might see past the monster inside her. And Allie soon must decide what—and who—is worth dying for.
Beginning:
They hung the Unregistereds in the old warehouse district; it was a public execution, so everyone went to see.
Unregistereds? Public execution? The first sentence just drops you into a strange and dangerous world and almost forces you to keep reading to find out what is happening.


Friday 56:

He glared at me. "Rat started telling everyone you'd been Taken. Stick was freaking out. I had to tell both of them to shut up or I'd put a fist in their face."

Thursday, April 19, 2012

ARC Review: Rebel Fire by Andrew Lane

Rebel Fire (Sherlock Holmes: the Legend Begins)
Author: Andrew Lane
Publication: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR) (April 24, 2012)


Description: Fourteen-year-old Sherlock Holmes knows that Amyus Crowe, his mysterious American tutor, has some dark secrets. But he didn't expect to find John Wilkes Booth, the notorious assassin, apparently alive and well in England—and Crowe somehow mixed up in it. When no one will tell you the truth, sometimes you have to risk all to discover it for yourself. And so begins an adventure that will take Sherlock across the Atlantic, to the center of a deadly web—where a friend is in peril and a defeated army threatens to rise again.


My Thoughts: What an action-packed adventure! I loved this new Sherlock Holmes story. Sherlock is fourteen, living with an aunt and uncle, being tutored by Amyus Crowe, and honing the skills he will have as an adult detective. The time is just after the American Civil War. Mycroft comes to Amyus to have him investigate the rumor that John Wilkes Booth didn't die shortly after Lincoln's assassination but rather escaped and is currently in England. Sherlock and his friend Matty go to investigate the house where Booth is supposed to be and run into a real nest of villains. This leads to Matty's kidnapping. In order to rescue him and track down Booth, Amyus, his daughter Virginia, and Sherlock need to go to America. 

The company travels on a paddle steamer owned by Cunard Lines. Sherlock is chased into the engine room by a villain and the description is so good that I could feel the heat and hear the thundering roar of the engines. His ocean voyage also introduces him to Rufus Stone, the violinist who introduces Holmes to the instrument. Holmes also meets Graf von Zeppelin on the ocean crossing.

Once in America, Sherlock explores New York searching for Matty. He and Virginia end up on a train bound for Virginia when they finally manage to free Matty. However, this just throws all three of them into the hands of the creepiest villain I have read about for a long time. Duke Balthassar reminds me of the most over-the-top of the James Bond villains. He is extremely tall and thin, dresses in white, wears a porcelain mask, and lets leeches feed on him. He also collects rare animals and attempts to feed Sherlock, Virginia, and Matty to some monitor lizards. He also has a plan to restore the Confederacy by conquering Canada.

The action is non-stop and Sherlock is a hero to admire. I can't wait for the next adventure in this series. I strongly recommend this book and the first book in the series - Death Cloud - to all adventure lovers.


Favorite Quote:
Sherlock shook his head. "I think there's always danger, wherever you go. You can either ignore it, or you can wrap yourself in blankets so it doesn't hurt you, or you can walk towards it and dare it to do its worst. If you do the first thing, then the danger takes you by surprise. If you do the second thing, then you spend all your time swaddled up in the dark, letting the world pass you by. The only logical course of action is to go towards the danger. The more you get used to it, the better you can deal with it."
I received this ARC from Macmillan Children's Publishing Group in exchange for an honest review. You can buy your copy here.

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Give Your Child A Free Kindle Book Day (Or 15 of Them!)


Date: April 19 Only

The Event: Fill up your Kindle and get your children reading this summer with these 15 books, free on Kindle only on April 19 during the Give Your Child A Free Kindle Book (or 15 of Them!) Promotion. The list includes picture books, middle grade novels, and young adult books spanning a range of topics from sports, to paranormal, to historical, to educational. Selected books include the Florida Historical Society's Best Children's book of its year,  books that have been recommended in Best Books for Young Teen Readers Grades 7-10 and in an edition of Children's Book of the Year compiled by the Child Study Children's Book Committee in New York City, and a finalist in the Valley Forge Romance Writers Sheila contest and in the Florida Romance Writers Golden Palm contest.

Belgrave House has also offered a 16th bonus book, an Agatha-awarding winning novel, which will be free on that day and can be downloaded in the e-book format of your choice.

The authors in the promotion have been published by houses such as Scholastic, Dell, HarperCollins, Simon Pulse, Avon, E.P. Dutton, Millbrook, Lerner, and St. Martin's Minotaur, and have written for Broadway, to name a few of their accomplishments. Don't miss this one-day exclusive offer to give your child an e-book (or many e-books!) Adult readers will find much to enjoy on this list also.

The Books:

Captain Morgana Mason by Dorothy Francis - Gramp falls ill.  Morgana and her younger brother, Seth take charge of the family's sponging business, using their small boat to hook sponges from the sea and sell them. Housekeeper, Goldie, adds humor and wisdom to the tale. You'll root for Morgana as she seeks her strengths and grapples with the adult world.  The Florida Historical Society voted this book as the best Children's book of its year.
Dark Before Dawn by Stacy Juba - When teen psychic Dawn Christian gets involved with a fortuneteller mentor and two girls who share her mysterious talents, she finally belongs after years of being a misfit. When she learns her new friends may be tied to freak “accidents” in town, Dawn has an important choice to make – continue developing the talent that makes her special or challenge the only people who have ever accepted her.


Face-Off by Stacy Juba: Brad’s twin brother T.J. has gotten himself out of the fancy prep school his father picked for him and into the public high school Brad attends. The whole school is rooting for a big double-strength win…not knowing that their twin hockey stars are heating up the ice for a winner takes all face-off. Included in the reference guide Best Books for Young Teen Readers Grades 7-10 and recommended by the Hockey Hall of Fame Junior Education Program.


Einstein The Lazy Kitty by Renae Rae - This 30-page story is inspired by Renae Rae's real-life lazy kitty.Einstein The Lazy Kitty, combines rhythmic writing and colorful illustrations to make this a short, fun book for all ages but it was designed with your toddler and early reader in mind.


Teddy Bear Town Children's E-Book Bundle (Three Complete Picture Books) by Stacy Juba - Immerse your child in the gentle world of teddy bears with three picture books in one download. Each story is fully illustrated with simple illustrations of teddy bear families. Includes The Flag KeeperVictoria Rose and the Big Bad Noise, and Sticker ShoesThe Midwest Book Review on The Flag Keeper: "Excellent educational book filled with information all American children should know."


The Worldwide Dessert Contest: Enhanced Multimedia Edition by Dan Elish - Pancakes that turn into trampolines, attacking caramel apples, roller-skating pies, are all a part of The Worldwide Dessert Contest: Enhanced Multimedia Edition by Dan Elish, a lip-smacking middle grade fantasy with an original musical score by a Broadway veteran embedded alongside the text! After losing to a cheat for the past eleven years, will chef Applefeller finally manage to nab the prize?
Savage Cinderella by PJ Sharon - Eighteen-year-old Brinn Hathaway has survived on her own in the Northwest High Country of Georgia since she was left for dead in a shallow grave by the man who kidnapped her as a child. When a young nature photographer, Justin Spencer, catches the wild girl on film and the two form a tentative friendship, Brinn must decide if coming out of hiding is worth the hope-and the danger-that may await her.
Ashlyn's Radio by Wilson Doherty (Norah Wilson and Heather Doherty) - When circumstances force 17-y-o Ashlyn Caverhill to move to her grandma's in Maine, she's PO'd. Although it boasts the hot Caden Williams, she thinks Prescott Junction is the deadest place ever. She may be right. Not only does a ghost train roll through at night, but the Caverhill-cursed radio Ashlyn finds foretells that she'll board it! With Caden's help, she must find a way to escape her fate.



Dark Ascension: A Demon Anthology by N.R. Wick - Keep a flashlight handy. This collection of short stories for young adults is sure to draw out whatever's skulking in the shadows. From supernatural entities, to crazed monsters, to disturbing discoveries, evil is lurking 'round every corner. Delve into the dark recesses of this creepy book… if you dare.
The Younger Days by Mike Hays - In the beginning, Boy Smyth has a dull Missouri farm life and a burning desire to be an outlaw like his hero, Cole Younger. In the end, Boy Smyth has five dead bodies and two burning buildings at his farm and the most feared man in the United States crying outside his front gate. And that desire for the outlaw life? It's purged completely from his system. 
Practice Cake by Dalya Moon - There's one thing Maddie Bird (18) finds more tempting than red velvet cake: her coworker, Drew. All it takes is one of his sly winks or a playful hip-check by the cooler, and she's incinerating the cookies. Her boyfriend would not approve. When a reality TV crew descends upon the bakery, her simple summer job gets even more complicated.

Away from Whipplethorn by A.W. Hartoin - Tiny fairies. Huge adventure. Matilda is about to get what she’s always wanted, and it’s a bad thing. Being a babysitter isn’t much of a dream, but Matilda is anything but average. She’s half a centimeter tall, invisible to the human eye, and hearing-impaired. In her life, adventures are in short supply, but there is a emergency list for her first job. The only problem; humans aren’t on the list.  

Grammar Candy by Katrina Streza - Have you ever wondered what exactly an adjective was? Drawn a blank when your child asked for help with English grammar homework? In Grammar Candy, the second book by educator Katrina Streza, Danny and Sam are back for another candy-filled learning adventure. This time, they'll turn a grammar lesson into some sweet fun when they visit Mr. Candor's Candy Shop and learn about nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs and more. For candy-loving kids in grades 1-3 (and their parents too)!

Who likes going to the doctor? Who wants their child to grow up to be a doctor?
Whether you're looking to alleviate anxiety or plant the suggestion early, DOCTOR features 25 full-color photos of doctors, nurses and medical equipment.Like other titles in the Kindle Kids Library from Xist Publishing, DOCTOR has been formatted to take advantage of the Kindle, Kindle Fire and Kindle apps for phones, tablets and computers.

Time to Get Ready, Bunny! by Brenda Ponnay - It's time to get ready, Bunny! Bunny? BUNNY? In this charming little book, author/illustrator Brenda Ponnay has artfully depicted the morning routine of so many families. Whether your little one would rather stay in bed, play with toys, or try on every outfit in the closet, this book is sure to resonate with parents.

Don't miss the free bonus book, compatible with many types of e-readers! Offered by author Nancy Means Wright and Belgrave House:

The Pea Soup Poisonings by Nancy Means Wright - To get into her brother's Spy Club, Zoe must walk a high narrow beam over rusted farm machinery and then discover who poisoned Granny Fairweather's pea soup. She has 5 days to find the culprit. Can she do it? Winner of an Agatha award for Best Children’s/Young Adult Novel.

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I know that a few of these are going to end up on my Kindle. I added pictures for them. Do any of them sound good to you?